O2 tests fuel calls for mobile TV spectrum

Jan 17, 2006

Mobile television developers Tuesday called on the British government to unlock spectrum bands that are optimal for the fledgling technology.

Speaking at a news conference, executives at O2 and other companies said that O2's recent trials in Oxford showed a healthy acceptance of mobile TV by consumers and that the industry needed a united voice so the new technology would be accommodated by government regulators.

According to Silicon.com, O2 Vice President Mike Short said: "We need the right spectrum. We want to explore much more UK collaborative activity."

Mobile television is currently based on the DVB-H (digital video broadcasting) technical standard, which is gaining acceptance in Europe because it is cheaper and doesn't require the bandwidth that television streaming needs.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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