Professor accused of telling secrets

Jan 16, 2006

A California biotech company has reportedly filed a legal action against a University of Connecticut professor, alleging he disclosed trade secrets.

Sequoia Sciences Inc. of San Diego accuses Chemical Engineering Professor Thomas Wood of disclosing trade secrets connected to research he did for Sequoia on a compound that prevents a protective film from forming over bacteria.

Wood allegedly disclosed the confidential information at various scientific conferences, the Hartford (Conn.) Courant said Monday.

Wood is now teaching in the Texas A&M University system.

Sequoia told the Courant it owns the biofilm inhibitors Wood tested through the company's contract with the University of Connecticut.

Wood's lawyer, Texas Assistant Attorney General Robert Henneke, is asking a U.S. District Court judge in Connecticut to dismiss the case. Henneke says Connecticut was the wrong place to file the legal action, since Wood lives in Texas, Sequoia is located in California and the conferences were in Atlanta and San Francisco.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Public boarding school—the way to solve educational ills?

Related Stories

Testing virtual nuclear stockpiles

Nov 25, 2013

In 2010 the Pentagon revealed it had a total of 5,113 warheads in its nuclear stockpile, down from a peak of 31,225 at the height of the Cold War in 1967.

Why Christmas trees are not extinct

Dec 22, 2005

Conifers such as Christmas trees suffer a severe plumbing problem. The "pipes" that carry water through firs, pines and other conifers are 10 times shorter than those in flowering trees. But a University of ...

Recommended for you

Public boarding school—the way to solve educational ills?

Apr 25, 2015

Buffalo's chronically struggling school system is considering an idea gaining momentum in other cities: public boarding schools that put round-the-clock attention on students and away from such daunting problems as poverty, ...

Study finds we think better on our feet, literally

Apr 24, 2015

A study from the Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Public Health finds students with standing desks are more attentive than their seated counterparts. In fact, preliminary results show 12 percent ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.