Rabbit eggs may be used for stem cells

Jan 13, 2006

Scientists in Scotland are planning to create animal-human embryos cloned from human skin cells and unfertilized rabbit eggs.

Ian Wilmut, of Edinburgh University, and Chris Shaw, of King's College in London, want to clone rabbit-human embryos for stem-cell research, the Independent reported Friday. Wilmut is credited for having cloned Dolly the sheep.

The moved is considered to be a way around the Human Fertilization and Embryology Act, which stipulates that human embryos created by cloning cannot be allowed to survive beyond the 14-day stage of development.

However, the HFEA Act does not cover the creation of animal-human embryos, according to the Human Fertilization and Embryology Authority.

The scientists will need a license for animal-human embryo research.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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