Ancient bodies found in Irish bog

Jan 12, 2006

Researchers in Ireland and Britain are revealing details about two 2-millennia-old bodies found in Irish peat bogs.

The bodies, both of males, have been dated to have lived move than 2,000 years ago and probably belong to the victims of a ritual sacrifice, the BBC reported.

The first body dropped off a peat cutting machine in February 2003 in Clonycavan, near Dublin. The second body was found in May the same year in Croghan, 25 miles from Clonycavan, the BBC said.

Both bodies were taken to the National Museum of Ireland in Dublin, where experts have been trying to determine how the men lived and died.

Radiocarbon dating shows that both had died around 2,300 years ago. Like other bodies found in Irish bogs, these had signs of having been tortured.

Hundreds of bodies have been recovered from peat wetlands across Northern Europe. The chemistry of peat bogs essentially mummifies bodies.

The BBC's Timewatch is producing a documentary about the find. The program is to be broadcast Jan. 20.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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