China develops magnetic levitation train

Jan 10, 2006
China develops magnetic levitation train

Chinese engineers have developed a medium- to low-speed magnetic levitation train that travels 93 miles an hour.

The quiet low-pollution train will be mainly used in urban areas, Xinhua news service reported.

The train consumes less energy than faster maglev trains.

China opened the world's first commercial magnetic levitation train with the highest velocity of more than 267 miles per hour in Shanghai in 2002, based on German technology.

Maglev train lines have been considered as an effective means to deal with the heavy passenger flow in the Yangtze River Delta, one of the economic powerhouses in China, the news service said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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