Archeological dig offers online viewing

Jan 06, 2006
Archeological dig offers online viewing

Egyptologist Betsy Bryan and her crew are sharing their work with the world through an online diary.

Visitors to "Hopkins in Egypt Today" at www.jhu.edu/neareast/egypttoday.html will find photos of Bryan and her students working on Johns Hopkins University's 11th annual excavation at the Mut Temple Precinct in Luxor.

Bryan said the site is rich in finds from the Egyptian New Kingdom, known as the "golden age" of Egyptian temple building.

This is the sixth year Bryan and her team will be excavating the area behind the temple's sacred lake.

The university said the goal of the Web site is to educate visitors by showing them the elements of archaeological work in progress. Photographer Jay VanRensselaer will capture images of the team as they sift through trenches, uncovering mud brick walls, pottery sherds, animal bones and other remains.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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