Study lauds India's biotech industry

Apr 10, 2007

A Canadian study suggests India's biotech firms are becoming major global players, increasingly able to produce drugs and vaccines at competitive costs.

The budding of an innovative Indian biotech sector holds major implications for the global industry and for improving both health and prosperity in the developing world, said study co-author Dr. Peter Singer of the McLaughlin-Rotman Center for Global Health at the University of Toronto.

"India is innovating its way out of poverty," said Singer. "With a massive and increasingly well-educated workforce, India is poised to revolutionize biotechnology just as it did the information technology industry.

"India's biotech sector is like a baby elephant -- when it matures, it will occupy a lot of space," he added. "The biotech industry is globalizing rapidly and the impact of India's market entry and contribution to improving world health is potentially huge."

The research by Singer -- with co-authors Dr. Abdallah Daar, Sarah Frew, Monali Ray, Rahim Rezaie and Stephen Sammut -- appears in the current edition of the journal Nature Biotechnology.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Love at first smell: Can birds choose mates by their odors?

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Robust methods for GMO detection ready at hand

Nov 10, 2010

A new Reference Report published today by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC) lists 79 reference methods for GMO analysis which have been validated according to international standards. This Compendium, ...

Androgen receptor may explain male dominance in liver cancer

May 19, 2010

A University of Rochester study helps to explain why men get liver cancer more often than women and opens the door for a new treatment pathway, by showing a direct link between the androgen receptor, which is more active ...

Recommended for you

How can we avoid kelp beds turning into barren grounds?

2 hours ago

Urchins are marine invertebrates that mould the biological richness of marine grounds. However, an excessive proliferation of urchins may also have severe ecological consequences on marine grounds as they ...

Genomes of malaria-carrying mosquitoes sequenced

18 hours ago

Nora Besansky, O'Hara Professor of Biological Sciences at the University of Notre Dame and a member of the University's Eck Institute for Global Health, has led an international team of scientists in sequencing ...

Bitter food but good medicine from cucumber genetics

18 hours ago

High-tech genomics and traditional Chinese medicine come together as researchers identify the genes responsible for the intense bitter taste of wild cucumbers. Taming this bitterness made cucumber, pumpkin ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.