Ancient fish fossils uncovered in China

Jan 03, 2006

A large layer of fish fossils, estimated to be more than 70 million years ago, was found in a bamboo forest in southwest China's Sichuan Province.

Xinhua news service said the fossils, each about 6 to 12 inches in length were found over about 250 acres.

"The discovery is of great importance for the study of the fish evolution and the ancient geomorphological structure in this area," said geologists from the Sichuan University.

A geologist said the fossils were in such good condition that they can see the scales of the fish clearly.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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