Survey: Sexes still differ on Web use

Dec 29, 2005
Surfing the Web

A new survey shows that men and women have differing goals in mind when they log on to the Internet.

Research from the Pew Internet and American Life Project found that while American men focus more on Internet transactions and information searches, women are more enthusiastic about e-mail exchanges and relationships with other people.

Pew found that men tend to use the Internet more than women, although that trend is reversed in the 30-and-under age group. Older men continue to use the Internet more than women in their age bracket.

"Still, our data show that men and women are more similar than different in their online lives, starting with their common appreciation of the internet's strongest suit: efficiency," Pew said in a release accompanying the report. "Both men and women approach with gusto online transactions that simplify their lives by saving time on such mundane tasks as buying tickets or paying bills."

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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