Survey: Sexes still differ on Web use

Dec 29, 2005
Surfing the Web

A new survey shows that men and women have differing goals in mind when they log on to the Internet.

Research from the Pew Internet and American Life Project found that while American men focus more on Internet transactions and information searches, women are more enthusiastic about e-mail exchanges and relationships with other people.

Pew found that men tend to use the Internet more than women, although that trend is reversed in the 30-and-under age group. Older men continue to use the Internet more than women in their age bracket.

"Still, our data show that men and women are more similar than different in their online lives, starting with their common appreciation of the internet's strongest suit: efficiency," Pew said in a release accompanying the report. "Both men and women approach with gusto online transactions that simplify their lives by saving time on such mundane tasks as buying tickets or paying bills."

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: US company sells out of Ebola toys

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Grindr relents to user backlash – but does it respect its users?

Sep 03, 2014

The world's most popular gay social networking app, Grindr, is having a tough time. William Saponaro Jr is suing its developers for negligence, after he was arrested for sexual assault and endangering the welfare of a child. Sapnaro claims a 13 ...

Recommended for you

US company sells out of Ebola toys

Oct 17, 2014

They might look tasteless, but satisfied customers dub them cute and adorable. Ebola-themed toys have proved such a hit that one US-based company has sold out.

New progress of the Neogene Suidae research

Oct 17, 2014

Dr. Hou Sukuan and Prof. Deng Tao from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology(IVPP), Chinese Academy of Sciences reported a new species of Chleuastochoerus from the Linxia Basin, Gansu ...

Gypsies and travellers on the English Green Belt

Oct 17, 2014

The battle between Gypsies, Travellers and the settled community over how land can be used has moved to the Green Belt, observes Peter Kabachnik of the City University of New York.

Cadavers beat computers for learning anatomy

Oct 16, 2014

Despite the growing popularity of using computer simulation to help teach college anatomy, students learn much better through the traditional use of human cadavers, according to new research that has implications ...

User comments : 0