Rare black vulture in rehabilitation

Mar 19, 2007

A rare black vulture that lost its direction is being rehabilitated in Thailand at Kasetsart University's Kamphaeng Saen campus.

Anakin, the 2-year-old bird, apparently lost its direction during migratory season earlier this year. The Jan. 3 discovery of the bird was exciting to ornithologists and other bird enthusiasts because it is believed there are only about 20,000 black vultures in the world, the Bangkok Post reported.

At Kasetsart, the newspaper said, veterinarians have developed a program to allow Anakin to strengthen its wing muscles and regain its predatory instincts.

Upon successful completion of rehabilitation, the veterinarians plan to release Anakin to its native land of Mongolia.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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