Briefs: EC approves Dutch lid on cable price

Dec 21, 2005

The European Commission Wednesday approved the Netherlands' telecom regulator to prevent price increases by the country's three biggest cable companies.

The commission said that the three biggest cable operators in the Netherlands will not be able to increase prices for one year, a plan that was initially put forward by the regulator OPTA.

The commission added, however, that "as this is the first time that a member state has sought to regulate the retail broadcasting market, the commission requires the Dutch regulator to monitor market developments closely."

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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