Quantum dots to be explored for use as fluorescent standards

Aug 24, 2004
Quantum dots to be explored for use as fluorescent standards

Evident Technologies, Inc. announced today that it has entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to explore the use of quantum dot composite fluorescent standards for biotech instrumentation. Fluorescence-based measurements are becoming the standard for genomic research, clinical diagnostics, high-through-put screening, forensic determination and drug discovery. However, absolute fluorescent measurements are difficult since there are few fluorescent standards available today.

“A fluorescence standard is necessary, especially for clinical applications, where quantification is required. It is nearly impossible to quantify the fluorescence from an assay today, but our collaboration with NIST should greatly advance the state of the art,” said Clint Ballinger, CEO, of Evident Technologies.

Gary Kramer from NIST said, “Traditional fluorescing materials, such as organic dyes, lose fluorescence intensity due to photodegradation and are ill-suited for use as standards. Evident's quantum dots are very promising in this application since they should be significantly more stable, an attribute required of a standard.”

Under the CRADA, Evident Technologies will provide quantum dot composites and NIST will be providing its expertise in fluorescent measurement to characterize these materials. Providing some of the first measurements on these new quantum dot composites and coatings, will help determine how this technology can be used to produce stable fluorescent standards.

Source: Evident Technologies, Inc.

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