Quantum dots to be explored for use as fluorescent standards

Aug 24, 2004
Quantum dots to be explored for use as fluorescent standards

Evident Technologies, Inc. announced today that it has entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to explore the use of quantum dot composite fluorescent standards for biotech instrumentation. Fluorescence-based measurements are becoming the standard for genomic research, clinical diagnostics, high-through-put screening, forensic determination and drug discovery. However, absolute fluorescent measurements are difficult since there are few fluorescent standards available today.

“A fluorescence standard is necessary, especially for clinical applications, where quantification is required. It is nearly impossible to quantify the fluorescence from an assay today, but our collaboration with NIST should greatly advance the state of the art,” said Clint Ballinger, CEO, of Evident Technologies.

Gary Kramer from NIST said, “Traditional fluorescing materials, such as organic dyes, lose fluorescence intensity due to photodegradation and are ill-suited for use as standards. Evident's quantum dots are very promising in this application since they should be significantly more stable, an attribute required of a standard.”

Under the CRADA, Evident Technologies will provide quantum dot composites and NIST will be providing its expertise in fluorescent measurement to characterize these materials. Providing some of the first measurements on these new quantum dot composites and coatings, will help determine how this technology can be used to produce stable fluorescent standards.

Source: Evident Technologies, Inc.

Explore further: Thinnest feasible nano-membrane produced

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Two in one solution for low cost polymer LEDs and solar cells

Jul 22, 2013

UNIST researchers report considerable improvement in device performance of polymer-based optoelectronic devices. Published in Nature Photonics today, the new plasmonic material, can be applied to both polymer light-emitting diodes ...

Recommended for you

Thinnest feasible nano-membrane produced

15 hours ago

A new nano-membrane made out of the 'super material' graphene is extremely light and breathable. Not only can this open the door to a new generation of functional waterproof clothing, but also to ultra-rapid filtration. The ...

Wiring up carbon-based electronics

17 hours ago

Carbon-based nanostructures such as nanotubes, graphene sheets, and nanoribbons are unique building blocks showing versatile nanomechanical and nanoelectronic properties. These materials which are ordered ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Thinnest feasible nano-membrane produced

A new nano-membrane made out of the 'super material' graphene is extremely light and breathable. Not only can this open the door to a new generation of functional waterproof clothing, but also to ultra-rapid filtration. The ...

Wiring up carbon-based electronics

Carbon-based nanostructures such as nanotubes, graphene sheets, and nanoribbons are unique building blocks showing versatile nanomechanical and nanoelectronic properties. These materials which are ordered ...

Scientists tether lionfish to Cayman reefs

Research done by U.S. scientists in the Cayman Islands suggests that native predators can be trained to gobble up invasive lionfish that colonize regional reefs and voraciously prey on juvenile marine creatures.

Leeches help save woman's ear after pit bull mauling

(HealthDay)—A pit bull attack in July 2013 left a 19-year-old woman with her left ear ripped from her head, leaving an open wound. After preserving the ear, the surgical team started with a reconnection ...

Six Nepalese dead, six missing in Everest avalanche

At least six Nepalese climbing guides have been killed and six others are missing after an avalanche struck Mount Everest early Friday in one of the deadliest accidents on the world's highest peak, officials ...