Microsoft faces lawsuit from Visto

Dec 15, 2005

A mobile e-mail company Thursday filed a lawsuit against Microsoft for misusing its proprietary technology.

Redwood Shores, Calif.-based Visto stated that the software giant has "infringed upon multiple patents Visto holds regarding proprietary technology that provides enterprises and consumers with mobile access to their e-mail and other data. The company is seeking a permanent injunction that would prohibit Microsoft from misappropriating the technology that Visto and its co-founder helped develop nearly a decade ago."

"Microsoft has a long and well-documented history of acquiring the technology of others, branding it as their own, and entering new markets," said Brian Bogosian, Visto's chief executive. "In some cases, they buy that technology from its creator. In other cases, they wrongfully misappropriate the intellectual property that belongs to others, which has forced them to acknowledge and settle large (intellectual property) cases with companies like Sun, AT&T and Burst.com. For their foray into mobile email and data access, Microsoft simply decided to misappropriate Visto's well known and documented patented technology."

Specifically, the company alleged that Microsoft's Mobile 5.0 is a "blatant infringement on Visto's patented technology."

The suit has been filed with the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Texas.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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