Spirit Studying Algonquin

Dec 15, 2005

This week Spirit drove to an outcrop area informally named "Algonquin." On sol 685, Spirit successfully drove for 15 meters (49 feet) and prepared for a series of robotic-arm activities planned for sol 687 to 690 at Algonquin. Plans are to proceed downhill to "Comanche" after that.

Sol 680 (Dec. 1, 2005): Spirit drove 30 meters (98 feet) toward a feature between "Miami" and Comanche.

Sol 681: Spirit performed remote sensing during the day and observed the moon Phobos at night.

Sol 682: Spirit took images of Algonquin, "Miami," "Pima," and "Yaqui" with the panoramic camera. Spirit observed Yaqui, Pima, Algonquin, "Meentwioni," and "Myammia" with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Sol 683: A planned drive toward Algonquin was not executed.

Sol 684: Spirit took images of a dust devil, did a near-field survey with the panoramic camera, and used the miniature thermal emission spectrometer during the day and at night.

Sol 685: Spirit successfully drove 16 meters (52 feet) to the Algonquin outcrop.

Sol 686: Spirit performed remote sensing during the day and observed the moon Phobos at night.

Sol 687: Spirit used the microscopic imager and alpha particle X-ray spectrometer to study a feature informally called "Iroquet," which is located on the Algonquin outcrop.

Sol 688: Spirit used the rock abrasion tool's brush on Iroquet for 25 minutes, and then continued observations of Iroquet with the microscopic imager and alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

As of the end of sol 686, (Dec. 8, 2005), Spirit had driven 5,510 meters (3.42 miles).

Copyright 2005 by Space Daily, Distributed United Press International

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