Nortel to sponsor 'One Laptop per Child'

Dec 14, 2005
$100 laptop

Nortel announced Wednesday that it has become a corporate member of the "One Laptop per Child" (OLPC) initiative.

OLPC, a non-profit organization, was formed earlier this year by Nicholas Negroponte and other faculty members from the MIT Media Lab. As a corporate member, high-tech networking company Nortel will provide an annual fee for purposes of funding OLPC initiatives.

The objective of OLPC is to develop a fully functioning, connected laptop to give the largest number of the world's children -- especially those in developing nations -- an educational tool.

According to OLPC, the laptop, currently in the early stages of development, is designed to be the size of a standard school notebook and will use wireless networking capabilities to allow children to interact with each other and access the Internet. It is expected to leverage built-in wireless capabilities that support WiFi and voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) and be used as a conventional computer, electronic book, handheld game console and function as a TV.

"Nortel has a firm belief in the power of communications technology to enhance the lives of people around the world. Our sponsorship of initiatives such as the OLPC can help address some of the greatest challenges in emerging markets," said Martha Bejar, president, Caribbean and Latin America and Emerging Markets Solutions, Nortel.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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