Embryonic stem cells could treat millions

Dec 09, 2005

British scientists say the stem cells taken from just 10 human embryos could supply suitable tissue to treat most of the U.K. population.

University of Cambridge researchers suggest the stem cells could stock a national bank that could treat about 80 percent of the British population, the Times of London reported Friday.

The stem cells can form any tissue and be used to replace cells that are diseased or damaged in conditions for people paralyzed or with diabetes and other diseases.

To ensure that the transplants of such cells would not be rejected it has been suggested that patients could be cloned therapeutically to provide embryos containing "perfect match" stem cells.

However, some experts say the idea may be impracticable and too costly, the Scotsman reported.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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