Embryonic stem cells could treat millions

Dec 09, 2005

British scientists say the stem cells taken from just 10 human embryos could supply suitable tissue to treat most of the U.K. population.

University of Cambridge researchers suggest the stem cells could stock a national bank that could treat about 80 percent of the British population, the Times of London reported Friday.

The stem cells can form any tissue and be used to replace cells that are diseased or damaged in conditions for people paralyzed or with diabetes and other diseases.

To ensure that the transplants of such cells would not be rejected it has been suggested that patients could be cloned therapeutically to provide embryos containing "perfect match" stem cells.

However, some experts say the idea may be impracticable and too costly, the Scotsman reported.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Secrets of dinosaur ecology found in fragile amber

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Is sending shoppers ads by Bluetooth just a bit creepy?

43 minutes ago

Using Bluetooth wireless networking to send information to nearby smartphones, beacon technology could transform how retailers engage with their customers. But customers will notice how their information is ...

To save the birds, look to the fish

43 minutes ago

Birds that dive for fish while wintering in the Salish Sea, located between British Columbia and Washington, are more likely to be in decline than nondiving birds with less specialized diets, according to ...

Recommended for you

Secrets of dinosaur ecology found in fragile amber

2 hours ago

Ryan McKellar's research sounds like it was plucked from Jurassic Park: he studies pieces of amber found buried with dinosaur skeletons. But rather than re-creating dinosaurs, McKellar uses the tiny pieces ...

User comments : 0