S. Korea customers cool on S-DMB quality

Dec 09, 2005

A survey Friday showed tepid consumer reaction to the introduction of satellite digital multimedia broadcasting in South Korea.

A lack of content and shaky service cooled the enthusiasm of the mobile television service known as S-DMB, which debuted last spring, according to a survey of 110,455 by a private market researcher.

S-DMB is designed to provide high-quality sound and video via handheld wireless devices.

A mere 24 percent of S-DMB users considered themselves satisfied with the service, while 45 percent said they were dissatisfied, primarily due to the absence of South Korea's three major broadcast networks.

A lack of compatible equipment was also noted -- only 1.5 percent of Korean mobile users owned handsets capable of pulling down S-DMB signals.

Analysts noted it could take some time before equipment and content catch up with the basic technology.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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