Java Mobile Phones Find the Way – New Mobile Navigation

Dec 06, 2005
Java Mobile Phones Find the Way – New Mobile Navigation

Java-enabled mobile phones are becoming mobile pathfinders. VDO Dayton has become the first supplier to launch a navigation system for cell phones that feature the widely used programming language Java. Navigation solutions for mobile phones that use the Symbian operating system have been available since early 2005.

Now, the MN 2200 navigation system is based on a conventional mobile telephone standard and can be operated via any network operator. With the navigation software and a satellite-controlled GPS receiver, a user’s cell phone doesn’t only offer simple pictograms as navigation aids; it also provides color maps, arrows and voice directions. The user enters the route data with the phone’s keypad, and the rest is handled by the software, mobile phone, GPS receiver and the central server at VDO Dayton, a subsidiary of Siemens VDO Automotive.

The route data is transmitted to the central server via a one-time, fee-based connection. Once the server has calculated the desired route, the information is then transmitted back to the mobile phone, and the trip directions begin. This represents a significant advantage over permanently installed navigation systems: Instead of determining the desired route using road maps on CDs, the mobile navigation solution relies on the continually updated server.

And regardless of whether users are traveling in their own vehicles, rental cars or riding motorcycles — the mobile phone also provides them with the latest reports of traffic jams and detours. In addition to providing the directions requested, the system also immediately sends alternative routes when needed. Data for longer trips is even sent to users at intervals as a trip progresses, to ensure the user always has the latest traffic reports. The MN2200 offers a selection of seven languages and is available from mobile communication providers and from VDO Dayton’s online shop.

Explore further: Quantenna promises 10-gigabit Wi-Fi by next year

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Ant colonies help evacuees in disaster zones

1 hour ago

An escape route mapping system based on the behavior of ant colonies could give evacuees a better chance of reaching safe harbor after a natural disaster or terrorist attack by building a map of showing the shortest routes ...

In the eye of the beholder

Jan 24, 2014

Astrobiologists are developing 'intelligent' instruments that could help future robotic explorers make their own decisions about where and how to collect data. Although focused on Mars exploration for the ...

Google Maps Navigation soon to be available offline

Jun 09, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- All About Phones, a Dutch-based tech site has released information that implies that Google Maps Navigation will have an offline version before the end of the summer. The information, which is o ...

Data from savvy cabbies to help improve online mapping

Nov 08, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- Microsoft is planning to tap into the intimate knowledge taxi drivers have of their cities to improve their online mapping systems and help drivers navigate to their destinations faster.

Recommended for you

'Chief Yahoo' David Filo returns to board

14 minutes ago

Yahoo announced the nomination of three new board members, including company co-founder David Filo, who earned the nickname and formal job title of "Chief Yahoo."

Fired Yahoo exec gets $58M for 15 months of work

24 minutes ago

Yahoo's recently fired chief operating officer, Henrique de Castro, left the Internet company with a severance package of $58 million even though he lasted just 15 months on the job.

Simplicity is key to co-operative robots

8 hours ago

A way of making hundreds—or even thousands—of tiny robots cluster to carry out tasks without using any memory or processing power has been developed by engineers at the University of Sheffield, UK.

Freight train industry to miss safety deadline

9 hours ago

The U.S. freight railroad industry says only one-fifth of its track will be equipped with mandatory safety technology to prevent most collisions and derailments by the deadline set by Congress.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Simplicity is key to co-operative robots

A way of making hundreds—or even thousands—of tiny robots cluster to carry out tasks without using any memory or processing power has been developed by engineers at the University of Sheffield, UK.

Microsoft CEO is driving data-culture mindset

(Phys.org) —Microsoft's future strategy: is all about leveraging data, from different sources, coming together using one cohesive Microsoft architecture. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella on Tuesday, both in ...

Floating nuclear plants could ride out tsunamis

When an earthquake and tsunami struck the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant complex in 2011, neither the quake nor the inundation caused the ensuing contamination. Rather, it was the aftereffects—specifically, ...

New clinical trial launched for advance lung cancer

Cancer Research UK is partnering with pharmaceutical companies AstraZeneca and Pfizer to create a pioneering clinical trial for patients with advanced lung cancer – marking a new era of research into personalised medicines ...

More vets turn to prosthetics to help legless pets

A 9-month-old boxer pup named Duncan barreled down a beach in Oregon, running full tilt on soft sand into YouTube history and showing more than 4 million viewers that he can revel in a good romp despite lacking ...