Taipei 101 may be causing earthquakes

Dec 02, 2005

Experts disagree on whether Taipei 101, the world's tallest building in Taipei, Taiwan, might be the cause of earthquakes.

At 700,000 tons, Taipei 101, also known as the Taipei Financial Center, may also be among the heaviest buildings in the world. Geologist Cheng Horng Lin of the National Taiwan Normal University says the stress from the skyscraper may have reopened an ancient earthquake fault, the Guardian reported Friday.

Before the skyscraper was built, the Taipei basin was a very stable area with no active earthquake faults at the surface with micro-earthquakes -- less than magnitude 2 occurring each year, says Lin.

"Since the construction finished there have been two larger earthquakes -- magnitude 3.8 and 3.2 -- directly beneath Taipei 101, which were big enough to feel," says Lin.

However, John Vidale, an earthquake expert at the University of California in Los Angeles says a building will change the stress on the ground under the building, but this probably not reach the level where earthquakes occur.

The findings are published in the Geophysical Research Letters.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Cassini: Return to Rhea

Related Stories

Flocks of starlings ride the wave to escape

3 hours ago

Why does it seem as if a dark band ripples through a flock of European starlings that are steering clear of a falcon or a hawk? It all lies in the birds' ability to quickly and repeatedly dip to one side to avoid being attacked. ...

Blue Freedom uses power of flowing water to charge

4 hours ago

Good friends may decide to tell you something that is not true but nonetheless sustaining: Nothing is impossible. That was the case of Blue Freedom co-founder who asked his friend if it would be possible ...

Recommended for you

Total lunar eclipse before dawn on April 4th

6 hours ago

An unusually brief total eclipse of the Moon will be visible before dawn this Saturday, April 4th, from western North America. The eclipse happens on Saturday evening for Australia and East Asia.

Cassini: Return to Rhea

18 hours ago

After a couple of years in high-inclination orbits that limited its ability to encounter Saturn's moons, NASA's Cassini spacecraft returned to Saturn's equatorial plane in March 2015.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.