S. Korean scientists to try monkey cloning

Dec 20, 2006

A team led by a South Korean scientist said it would soon attempt to perform the world's first cloning of a monkey.

"We are working on the mechanism of stimulating female monkey ovulation to gain eggs en masse, the minimal-must for cloning," team leader Chang Kyu-tae, of the Korea National Primate Research Center, said Wednesday. "After related regulations are set, we will begin cloning attempts with monkeys next year."

Chang said the team hopes to be successful in 2008, the Korea Times said.

The scientist said his team was cautious about its attempt because monkey cloning is important for developing an animal model that parallels human biology and can be used for preclinical tests in a number of areas.

Scientists have cloned domestic animals, including sheep and dogs, Chang said, but the reproductive cloning of monkeys has not been achieved.

In 2004, a U.S. scientist was reportedly close to cloning a monkey when his team cultured embryos to the blastocyst stage.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Environmental pollutants make worms susceptible to cold

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

A refined approach to proteins at low resolution

1 hour ago

Membrane proteins and large protein complexes are notoriously difficult to study with X-ray crystallography, not least because they are often very difficult, if not impossible, to crystallize, but also because ...

CloudFlare tackles lost SSL key risk with Keyless SSL

1 hour ago

Organizations looking for and concerned about optimal security protection are the targets of a new service announced by San Francisco-based CloudFlare. The offering is called Keyless SSL. CloudFlare explained ...

New hadrosaur noses into spotlight

1 hour ago

Call it the Jimmy Durante of dinosaurs – a newly discovered hadrosaur with a truly distinctive nasal profile. The new dinosaur, named Rhinorex condrupus by paleontologists from North Carolina State Univer ...

Recommended for you

Environmental pollutants make worms susceptible to cold

2 hours ago

Some pollutants are more harmful in a cold climate than in a hot, because they affect the temperature sensitivity of certain organisms. Now researchers from Danish universities have demonstrated how this ...

Research helps steer mites from bees

4 hours ago

A Simon Fraser University chemistry professor has found a way to sway mites from their damaging effects on bees that care and feed the all-important queen bee.

User comments : 0