Brain's 'true love' lasts only a year

Nov 29, 2005
love heart

Italian scientists have determined the brain chemical fired up when a person meets a "true love" doesn't last a lifetime, but rather, just 12 months.

When a person falls in love, levels of a protein called Nerve Growth Factor skyrocket, researchers from the University of Pavia found.

"We have demonstrated for the first time that circulating levels of NGF are elevated among subjects in love, suggesting an important role for this molecule in the social chemistry of human beings," said Dr. Enzo Emanuele, who led the study.

But, after studying a volunteer group of people between the ages of 18 and 31, researchers found the levels of NGF had fallen to original levels after one year, the Daily Mail reported.

Not to discourage romantics, the team wrote that they believe the same chemical also stimulates companionship, which is essential in any long-term relationship.

The report appears in the current Psychoneuroendocrinology journal.

Copyright 2005 UPI

Explore further: A word in your ear, but make it snappy

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Why aren't consumers buying remanufactured products?

1 hour ago

Firms looking to increase market share of remanufactured consumer products will have to overcome a big barrier to do so, according to a recent study from the Penn State Smeal College of Business. Findings from faculty members ...

Expecting to teach enhances learning, recall

1 hour ago

People learn better and recall more when given the impression that they will soon have to teach newly acquired material to someone else, suggests new research from Washington University in St. Louis.

A word in your ear, but make it snappy

Jul 28, 2014

To most, crocodiles conjure images of sharp teeth, powerful jaws and ferocious, predatory displays – but they are certainly not famous for their hearing abilities. However, this could all change, as new ...

User comments : 0