Science translation center opens in China

Nov 24, 2005

Elsevier and Science Press have announced a project to create a joint translation center in Beijing.

Elsevier, publisher of scientific, technical and medical information products, and Science Press, a scientific, technical and medical publisher in China, say the center will promote books and journals in the Chinese and international markets.

The joint translation center's first selection will include key Elsevier book and major reference work titles to be released in the Chinese market, and Science Press English language book titles to be introduced internationally by January.

On the journal side, a selection of STM journals, which are currently produced by Science Press as printed editions, will be jointly published and distributed in both print and ScienceDirect versions.

"The collaboration between Elsevier and Science Press sets an important precedent in the international exchange between global and Chinese academics" noted Paul Evans, vice president of Elsevier S&T China. "We are also extremely pleased that the joint translation center will enable Chinese scientists to considerably expand the reach of their research internationally."

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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