MEMS Making Their Mark in Consumer Electronics

Aug 17, 2004

MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems) are growing up fast when it comes to their integration into all kinds of Consumer Electronics (CE), reports In-Stat/MDR (http://www.instat.com). And while most applications, at this point, remain fairly niche, the high-tech market research believes that all signs point to more MEMS devices moving into an increasing number of product families, and thus, moving towards higher volumes. Continued reductions in price (at lower minimum quantities) and smaller form factors have been key to the increased use of MEMS. As a result, revenues for MEMS in consumer electronics are forecast to grow at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 13.2%, 2003 to 2008.

“If you’ve bought a state-of-the-art home theater projector and/or surround sound system in the past year or two, chances are pretty good that optical MEMS and accelerometers are helping to provide you with cinema-quality images and the most distortion-free sound available,” says Marlene Bourne, a Senior Analyst with In-Stat/MDR. “MEMS pressure sensors and thermopiles are hard at work in newer models of dishwashers and hair dryers, too. And, if you’re an early adopter, and lucky enough to live in Asia-Pacific or Europe, a few cell phone models have just become available that will allow you to actually interact with MEMS accelerometers – although most end-users will have no idea that that’s what they’re doing.”

A recent report from In-Stat/MDR also finds that:

The devices that are leading the way are optical MEMS, RF MEMS, and accelerometers, with pressure sensors, infrared sensors, gyros and microphones gaining ground.

Key markets include video (led by home theater systems), wireless (namely cell phones), and home appliances of all kinds, ranging from housewares, such as robotic vacuum cleaners, to white goods, such as washing machines. But don’t count out sporting goods and electronic gaming, two rapidly growing segments.

At this time, the most significant contributor of revenues is TI’s DLP in home theater and digital TVs, followed by Agilent Technologies’ FBAR duplexer in cell phones. In terms of unit shipments, the major contributor is Agilent’s duplexer, followed closely by sensors as a whole. Both are seeing an increasingly aggressive rate of integration into CE products, so their contribution to unit shipments are expected to remain fairly balanced over the next few years, although microphone shipments could change that.

For more information please contact In-Stat/MDR.

Explore further: How Kim Jong Un became the target of 'The Interview'

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Washington takes on Uber with its own taxi app

3 hours ago

Washington is developing a smartphone app to enable its taxis to compete head-on with Uber and other ride-sharing services, the US capital's taxi commission said Friday.

Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in living color

3 hours ago

Rosetta's OSIRIS team have produced a color image of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko as it would be seen by the human eye. As anticipated, the comet turns out to be very grey indeed, with only slight, subtle ...

EU clean air, waste laws at risk

3 hours ago

EU Commission chief Jean-Claude Juncker faces a clash with lawmakers after leaked documents Friday revealed his plans to drop laws on clean air and waste recycling.

Recommended for you

UN General Assembly OKs digital privacy resolution

1 hour ago

The U.N. General Assembly has approved a resolution demanding better digital privacy protections for people around the world, another response to Edward Snowden's revelations about U.S. government spying.

'Interview' ordeal at Sony just its latest crisis

2 hours ago

How do you say "damage control" in Japanese? Sony Corp. is sealed within a hermetic cone of silence as executives try to prevent the slow motion train wreck at Sony Pictures from damaging the rest of the ...

Study reveals mature motorists worse at texting and driving

2 hours ago

A Wayne State University interdisciplinary research team in the Eugene Applebaum College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences has made a surprising discovery: older, more mature motorists—who typically are better drivers in ...

Online privacy to remain thorny issue: survey

2 hours ago

Online privacy will remain a thorny issue over the next decade, without a widely accepted system that balances user rights and personal data collection, a survey of experts showed Thursday.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.