Internet becoming key health info spot

Nov 21, 2005

For 31.6 million U.S. adults, the Internet is their first stop for healthcare decisions, a new survey reported Monday.

According to Manhattan Research, the population of consumers using the Internet as their primary learning channel for health information continues an upward trajectory in 2005 with 31.6 million consumers reporting the Internet as their first stop when seeking more information.

"The health industry is adjusting to a world where the promises of 10 years ago, at the launch of the Internet generation, are finally becoming a market reality," stated Mark Bard, president of Manhattan Research. "The intersection of broadband, consumer-driven health, community and content, has created the perfect storm for the next generation of e-health. Consumers are in control and are increasingly seeking timely and efficient access to the information and tools that will help them manage their personal health and that of their friends and family."

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: World's largest solar boat on Greek prehistoric mission

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Surveillance a part of everyday life

Jul 24, 2014

Details of casual conversations and a comprehensive store of 'deleted' information were just some of what Victoria University of Wellington students found during a project to uncover what records companies ...

Share button may share your browsing history, too

Jul 22, 2014

One in 18 of the world's top 100,000 websites track users without their consent using a previously undetected cookie-like tracking mechanism embedded in 'share' buttons. A new study by researchers at KU Leuven ...

UP24 lifestyle bracelets take aim at waistlines

Jul 16, 2014

In the booming world of smart watches, pendants and bracelets that let people track sleep and steps, wearable computing pioneer Jawbone is out to win hearts through stomachs.

US scientists turn to public to help fund research

Jul 09, 2014

Duke University professor Kathleen Pryer has received her share of grant money. But for her newest project, she's getting help from a retired nurse in Canada and a 17-year-old in Arkansas.

Recommended for you

Local education politics 'far from dead'

7 hours ago

Teach for America, known for recruiting teachers, is also setting its sights on capturing school board seats across the nation. Surprisingly, however, political candidates from the program aren't just pushing ...

First grade reading suffers in segregated schools

7 hours ago

A groundbreaking study from the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute (FPG) has found that African-American students in first grade experience smaller gains in reading when they attend segregated schools—but the ...

Violent aftermath for the warriors at Alken Enge

7 hours ago

Denmark attracted international attention in 2012 when archaeological excavations revealed the bones of an entire army, whose warriors had been thrown into the bogs near the Alken Enge wetlands in East Jutland ...

Why aren't consumers buying remanufactured products?

9 hours ago

Firms looking to increase market share of remanufactured consumer products will have to overcome a big barrier to do so, according to a recent study from the Penn State Smeal College of Business. Findings from faculty members ...

Expecting to teach enhances learning, recall

9 hours ago

People learn better and recall more when given the impression that they will soon have to teach newly acquired material to someone else, suggests new research from Washington University in St. Louis.

User comments : 0