Canadian Arrow Team Successfully Tests Crew Capsule

Aug 15, 2004
X-Prize

A Canadian team engaged in the X-prize space race conducted a successful test Saturday. A helicopter dropped unoccupied version the crew capsule, from an altitude of about 9,000 feet in Lake Ontario at about 9 a.m. ET. The capsule's parachute deployed, and it landed safely in the lake just south of the Toronto Island Airport where it was retrieved.


Team leader Geoff Sheerin said the test went better than planned.

The Canadian Arrow is one of 26 teams from around the world competing for the $10 million US Ansari X prize.

Another team suffered a setback on August 8 , when the $20,000 rocket built by Space Transport Corp. exploded as it reached 1000 ft.

The first private manned spaceflight took place in June, when SpaceShipOne, a craft funded by billionaire Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen and designed by aviation pioneer Burt Rutan, reached the required altitude on a test flight.

About the X PRIZE Foundation
The X PRIZE Foundation is a not-for-profit educational organization with headquarters in St. Louis, Missouri. Supported by private donations and the St. Louis community, the Foundation’s mission is to create educational programming for students and space enthusiasts as well as provide incentives in the private sector to make space travel frequent and affordable for the general public. Several additional sponsorships for the ANSARI X PRIZE competition remain available to corporations or individuals who wish to support the X PRIZE Foundation and associate themselves with space, speed and high technology.

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