South China tigers may be extinct

Nov 20, 2006

Scientists fear the South China Tiger, one of the world's most endangered species, may be extinct in the wild.

If that is true, the only remaining members of the species are the 68 now living in 18 Chinese zoos, Xinhua, the official government new agency, said. Those tigers are all descended from two males and four females captured in either the 1950s or 1970s and provide too little genetic diversity to preserve the species.

"If we can't find any wild south China tigers, they will certainly disappear because of the inbreeding," said Huang Zihong, a zoologist.

Scientists from the South China Institute of Endangered Species began a search for wild tigers in October, but so far have had little success.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Italian olive tree disease stumps EU

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Public attitude toward tiger farming and tiger conservation

Jan 20, 2015

The wild tiger Panthera tigris is considered critically endangered, and it faces unprecedented threats, including habitat loss and fragmentation, depletion of prey, and continued illegal poaching for trade of tiger bones ...

Tiger genome to help big-cat conservation

Sep 17, 2013

South Korean scientists said on Tuesday they had carried out the first DNA analysis of the tiger and four other great felines in a project to help critically-endangered cats to survive.

New species discoveries in the Greater Mekong

Jun 05, 2014

A giant flying squirrel, a skydiving gecko, a fish that mates head-to-head, and an eyeless cave-dwelling spider are among the 367 new species revealed by scientists in the Greater Mekong region in 2012-2013, ...

Recommended for you

Italian olive tree disease stumps EU

19 hours ago

EU member states are divided on how to stop the spread of a disease affecting olive trees in Italy that could result in around a million being cut down, officials said Friday.

China starts relocating endangered porpoises: Xinhua

Mar 27, 2015

Chinese authorities on Friday began relocating the country's rare finless porpoise population in a bid to revive a species threatened by pollution, overfishing and heavy traffic in their Yangtze River habitat, ...

A long-standing mystery in membrane traffic solved

Mar 27, 2015

In 2013, James E. Rothman, Randy W. Schekman, and Thomas C. Südhof won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their discoveries of molecular machineries for vesicle trafficking, a major transport ...

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

kkmagician
not rated yet Aug 06, 2008
This is something people need to be aware of! These tigers are crticaly ENDANGERED! As far as I knew, they were extinct! Then I looked at this artical and was so relived. BUT also aware of the problems with these tigers. If we cared more than the average 20 people in the world, I bet all of the people in Indiana could do a search party for these tigers. Go to South China! COME ON! This is an actual problem to be aware of. I want to help these tigers, but I need more than 1 person to do it.
kkmagician
not rated yet Aug 06, 2008
This is something people need to be aware of! These tigers are crticaly ENDANGERED! As far as I knew, they were extinct! Then I looked at this artical and was so relived. BUT also aware of the problems with these tigers. If we cared more than the average 20 people in the world, I bet all of the people in Indiana could do a search party for these tigers. Go to South China! COME ON! This is an actual problem to be aware of. I want to help these tigers, but I need more than 1 person to do it.

And thats the TRUTH. If you want to help with this crisis, please comment this page back, Thank you for the concern of these beautiful tigers. They TRULY are beautiful!

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.