New species abound in NW Hawaiian Islands

Oct 30, 2006

A three-week U.S expedition to French Frigate Shoals in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Marine National Monument has returned with scores of new species.

The expedition of world-renowned biologists and support crew returned to Honolulu Sunday with several potentially new species of crabs, corals, sea cucumbers, sea quirts, worms, sea stars, snails and clams.

"It was a very successful expedition by almost any criterion, and the discovery phase has really only just begun," said Joel Martin of the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. "What we did not find is also important. There were several groups of animals that we expected to find, but did not find, or found only rarely, such as porcellanid crabs.

"The apparent absence of these common reef organisms may provide insight into how the unique flora and fauna of French Frigate Shoals came to be."

The work was conducted within the borders of the world's largest, fully protected marine area.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Decoding virus-host interactions in the oxygen-starved ocean

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Japan wraps up Pacific whale hunt

Jul 29, 2014

Japan announced Tuesday that it had wrapped up a whale hunt in the Pacific, the second campaign since the UN's top court ordered Tokyo to halt a separate slaughter in the Antarctic.

Fabien Cousteau ends mission at undersea lab (Update)

Jul 02, 2014

After 31 days undersea, Cousteau stepped off a boat wearing flip-flops and a beach towel wrapped around his waist, saying he was torn about leaving his underwater home, but he missed his family and friends.

Fabien Cousteau plans 31-day underwater mission

Jun 01, 2014

Like viewers worldwide, Fabien Cousteau was entranced by his famous grandfather's films about marine life and human exploration underwater. Now he's adding to his family's sea stories with a 31-day underwater ...

Call to ban trade on iconic Nautilus seashell

May 28, 2014

An internationally renowned palaeontologist, who has recently joined the University of Adelaide, is calling for a global ban on the trade of the highly sought-after Nautilus seashell – including from Western ...

Recommended for you

Meteorite that doomed dinosaurs remade forests

10 minutes ago

The meteorite impact that spelled doom for the dinosaurs 66 million years ago decimated the evergreens among the flowering plants to a much greater extent than their deciduous peers, according to a study ...

New camera sheds light on mate choice of swordtail fish

2 hours ago

We have all seen a peacock show its extravagant, colorful tail feathers in courtship of a peahen. Now, a group of researchers have used a special camera developed by an engineer at Washington University in ...

User comments : 0