Mathematicians predict Cy Young winners

Nov 08, 2005

Two Rhode Island mathematicians say they have calculated who will win the 2005 Major League Baseball Cy Young awards.

Mathematicians Rebecca Sparks and her husband, David Abrahamson of Rhode Island College say they've developed a mathematical formula that indicates the winners will be pitchers Chris Carpenter of the St. Louis Cardinals and Mariano Rivera of the New York Yankees.

The actual winners, representing the most outstanding American League and National League pitchers during the regular season, will be announced this week by the Baseball Writers' Association of America, whose members vote on the awards. The American League winner will be revealed Tuesday and the National League winner will be announced Thursday.

The researchers say they structured their formula to predict voting results for starting pitchers, who almost always win the award. However, their formula reveals a lack of standout AL starters this year, suggesting the AL award will go to relief pitcher Mariano Rivera for his extraordinary 2005 season.

Sparks and Abrahamson presented their model in the April issue of Math Horizons, published by the Mathematical Association of America.

Abrahamson will discuss the model during a regional MAA meeting Nov. 18-19 at the University of New Hampshire.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Greenland darkening to continue, predicts CCNY expert Marco Tedesco

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Expert offers advice on how to 'pitch' a good research idea

9 hours ago

For many students or junior academics—and even for senior investigators—initiating a new piece of research can be a daunting experience, and they often do not know where or how to begin. A recent Accounting and Finance ar ...

A better grasp of primate grip

9 hours ago

Scientists are coming to grips with the superior grasping ability of humans and other primates throughout history.

Oldest fossils controversy resolved

10 hours ago

New analysis of world-famous 3.46 billion-year-old rocks by researchers from The University of Western Australia is set to finally resolve a long-running evolutionary controversy.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.