Russian Supply Ship Blasted Off to the International Space Station

Aug 11, 2004
Progress M-50 cargo ship

Russian supply ship Progress M-50 blasted off to the International Space Station on Wednesday. The Progress supply vehicle will take two days to reach the International Space Station, carrying 3,042 pounds of dry cargo, 926 pounds of water, 110 pounds of oxygen and air and 1,521 pounds of propellant.

This Progress will be the 15th to visit the International Space Station. The Progress-type spacecraft are currently serving as supply vehicles for the International Space Station. Russia has launched all the manned and cargo ships to the station since last February when the United States grounded its shuttle fleet grounded until at least next spring after Columbia disintegrated on re-entry

Engineers estimate there is enough water on board to last the two-man crew about three months. If the Progress does not reach the station, water would run out 11 days before the next re-supply ship is set to arrive.

Explore further: Russia launches British comms satellite into space

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