Can't do math? You are not alone

Oct 27, 2005

Mayo Clinic researchers say they've determined Math Learning Disorder is common among school-age children, especially among boys.

The research indicates that although a child can have a Math LD and a reading LD, a substantial percentage of children have Math LD alone.

The scientists said as many as 14 percent of students up to age 19 might have Math LD, depending on which definition of Math LD is sued.

The researchers said "Learning Disability" is a term used to describe the seemingly unexplained difficulty a person of at least average intelligence has in acquiring basic academic skills that are essential for success at school, work and for coping with life in general.

The results of the Mayo Clinic study appear in the September-October issue of Ambulatory Pediatrics.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: When rulers can't understand the ruled

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Scientists given rare glimpse of 350-kilo colossal squid

20 minutes ago

Scientists said Tuesday a female colossal squid weighing an estimated 350 kilograms (770 lbs) and thought to be only the second intact specimen ever found was carrying eggs when discovered in the Antarctic.

Indonesia to ratify ASEAN haze agreement

1 hour ago

Indonesia's parliament on Tuesday voted to ratify a regional agreement on cross-border haze as fires ripped through forests in the west of the country, choking neighbouring Singapore with hazardous smog.

White House backs use of body cameras by police

3 hours ago

Requiring police officers to wear body cameras is one potential solution for bridging deep mistrust between law enforcement and the public, the White House said, weighing in on a national debate sparked by the shooting of ...

Recommended for you

When rulers can't understand the ruled

15 hours ago

Johns Hopkins University political scientists wanted to know if America's unelected officials have enough in common with the people they govern to understand them.

When casualties increased, war coverage became more negative

19 hours ago

As the number of U.S. casualties rose in Afghanistan, reporters filed more stories about the conflict and those articles grew increasingly negative about both the war effort and the military, according to a Penn State researcher. ...

User comments : 0