Ericsson dominates third-generation phones

Oct 21, 2005

Ericsson said Friday that it has about 30 percent of the global market share in third-generation mobile-phone handsets.

The Swedish mobile group said in a news release that since May 2004, the company has launched 23 third-generation handset models worldwide, and over 10 million units have been shipped, making it the single-biggest third-generation cell-phone manufacturer in the world.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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