Millipede feared extinct is found

Jul 31, 2006

U.S. biologists say Illacme plenipes, a millipede with up to 750 legs that was last seen 80 years ago, has been found in California.

Biologists Paul Marek and Jason Bond discovered the millipede in the California Floristic Province, south of Santa Cruz. Scientists said the millipede lives nowhere else on Earth.

Petra Sierwald of the Field Museum in Chicago confirmed the find after the biologists sent her the leggiest -- 660 legs -- of the 20 specimens uncovered by their initial search, the Chicago Sun-Times reported Monday. The 2-inch-long specimen, only half a millimeter wide, was preserved in alcohol.

The millipede was first described -- and last seen -- in 1926 by Howard Frederick Loomis, who spent part of his career at the Field Museum, and Orator Fuller Cook, the newspaper said.

The Field Museum is believed to have the world's fifth largest collection of millipedes with about 30,000 specimens.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Monarch butterflies plummet 90 percent, need protection

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Feeling bad at work can be a good thing

27 minutes ago

(Phys.org) —Research by the University of Liverpool suggests that, contrary to popular opinion, it can be good to feel bad at work, whilst feeling good in the workplace can also lead to negative outcomes.

Recommended for you

Water 'thermostat' could help engineer drought-resistant crops

27 minutes ago

Duke University researchers have identified a gene that could help scientists engineer drought-resistant crops. The gene, called OSCA1, encodes a protein in the cell membrane of plants that senses changes in water availability ...

Wolves susceptible to yawn contagion

1 hour ago

Wolves may be susceptible to yawn contagion, according to a study published August 27, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Teresa Romero from The University of Tokyo, Japan, and colleagues.

Walking fish reveal how our ancestors evolved onto land

2 hours ago

About 400 million years ago a group of fish began exploring land and evolved into tetrapods – today's amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. But just how these ancient fish used their fishy bodies and ...

User comments : 0