Microchip Announces Microcontrollers with KEELOQ Cryptographic Peripheral; Optimized for Battery-Powered Applications

Aug 09, 2004

New PIC(R) Microcontrollers Combine Data Transmission Security with Power Management

Microchip Technology Inc., a leading provider of microcontroller and analog semiconductors, today announced the first two PIC(R) 8-bit Flash microcontrollers with an integrated KEELOQ(R) cryptographic peripheral. The combination of this new KEELOQ peripheral, low-power consumption via nanoWatt Technology and reliable battery-powered operation provides a total solution for secure data transmission and authentication applications.

Designers of remotely controlled security systems and authentication products are encountering the need for an integrated solution that provides control of system power consumption and ensures reliable battery-powered operation. The new PIC12F635 and PIC16F636 microcontrollers meet these needs by providing engineers with the KEELOQ cryptographic peripheral, nanoWatt Technology power management modes, and reliable battery reset and detect features, including: Programmable Low Voltage Detect (PLVD), a Wake-up Reset (WUR) function, software-controlled Brownout Reset (BOR) and an Extended Watchdog Timer (EWDT).

"Microchip is building on its technology leadership in secure data products by combining the successful KEELOQ technology with our PIC microcontroller core," said Steve Drehobl, vice president of Microchip's Security, Microcontroller and Technology Division. "These two new microcontrollers provide a complete solution for remote authentication and security systems."

Applications for the PIC12F635 and PIC16F636 include: Remote Security Control (Remote Keyless Entry (RKE), Passive Keyless Entry (PKE), and remote door locks and gate openers); Authentication (property and identity); Security Systems (remote sensors and their intercommunication); and other General Purpose applications.

KEELOQ technology is based on a proprietary, non-linear encryption algorithm that creates a unique transmission on every use, rendering code capture and resend schemes useless. The new devices now feature this encryption algorithm as an integrated hardware peripheral to the PIC microcontroller core.

Additional features of these two new PIC microcontrollers include:

-- 8 MHz internal oscillator with software clock switching

-- Ultra Low Power Wakeup (ULPW)

-- Up to 3.5K bytes of Flash program memory, and up to 256 bytes of EEPROM data memory

-- Up to 128 bytes of RAM

-- Up to two analog comparators

Tools, Availability and Pricing

The PIC12F635 and PIC16F636 are supported by Microchip's world-class development tools, including: the MPLAB(R) Integrated Development Environment (IDE), MPLAB ICE 2000 in-circuit emulator, MPLAB PM3 universal device programmer, PICSTART(R) Plus low-cost development system, MPLAB ICD 2 in-circuit debugger/programmer and the PICkit(TM) 1 Flash starter kit.

The two new PIC microcontrollers are available today for sampling and volume production in the package options listed below. In 10,000-unit quantities, the PIC12F635 is $1.08 each and the PIC16F636 is $1.22 each. For additional information, contact any Microchip sales representative or authorized worldwide distributor, or visit Microchip's Web site at www.microchip.com/keeloq.

-- PIC12F635: 8-pin PDIP, SOIC and DFN-S

-- PIC16F636: 14-pin PDIP, SOIC and TSSOP

Source: Microchip Technology Inc

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