A Jurassic tree grows in Australia

Oct 17, 2005

The Wollemi pine, a 200 million-year-old tree from the Jurassic period long thought to be extinct, has reportedly been found growing in Australia.

The exact location is being kept secret -- even scientists are blindfolded before being flown to the site. A park ranger discovered a small grove of the trees in Australia, the London Mirror reported. Specimens are now to be sold by auction to make sure the species survives.

But the Mirror noted buyers will need a large garden, since the Wollemi pine tree can grow as high as 120 feet, with a three-foot-wide trunk.

Sydney's Royal Botanic Gardens told the newspaper the discovery is "the equivalent of finding a small dinosaur still alive".

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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