U.S. may lose its global lead in science

Oct 13, 2005

The Washington-based National Academies, the nation's leading science advisory group, is warning the United States may lose its global lead in science.

The 20-member panel, in a report released Wednesday, cited examples of emerging scientific and industrial power abroad and listed 20 steps the United States should take to maintain its global leadership in science.

"Decisive action is needed now," the report warned, explaining the nation's old advantages "are eroding at a time when many other nations are gathering strength."

The proposals include creation of scholarships to attract 10,000 top students a year to careers in teaching math and science, and 30,000 scholarships for college-level study of science, math and engineering.

The advisory group also urges expansion of the nation's investment in basic research by 10 percent a year for seven years; and making broadband access available nationwide at low cost.

A summary of the report is available online at nationalacademies.org.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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