More 'Hobbit' bones are discovered

Oct 11, 2005
A skull (L) found a year ago in Liang Bua cave on the Indonesian island of Flores and a human skull
A skull (L) found a year ago in Liang Bua cave on the Indonesian island of Flores and a human skull

Paleontologists digging on the remote Indonesian island of Flores say they've found more bones of Homo floresiensis, a tiny hominin species.

The findings include a jawbone, and the right arm belonging to the owner of a skull, found last year.

Scientists say the bones provide evidence that H. floresiensis -- small human-like "hobbits" -- were a naturally tiny species, rather than suffering from an abnormally small brain size.

The species was nicknamed "Hobbits" after a race found in fantasy author J.R.R. Tolkien's Middle-Earth universe that first appears in his book "The Hobbit."

The research team, led by Michael Morwood of Australia's University of New England, said dating the remains suggests they were present on the island as recently as 12,000 years ago.

The discovery is detailed in the journal Nature.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: US company sells out of Ebola toys

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

'Hobbit' more likely had Down Syndrome than a new species

Aug 05, 2014

Many people believe that what was found in Liang Bua Cave on the island of Flores in Indonesia in 2003-2004 was some variety of hobbit-like human or prehuman. Our research published today argues that it was more likely just one of th ...

Mysterious ancient human crossed Wallace's Line

Oct 17, 2013

Scientists have proposed that the most recently discovered ancient human relatives—the Denisovans—somehow managed to cross one of the world's most prominent marine barriers in Indonesia, and later interbred with modern ...

Were 'hobbit' hominids island dwarfs?

Apr 16, 2013

Japanese scientists on Tuesday waded into a row over so-called "hobbit" hominids whose remains, found on a remote Indonesian island a decade ago, have unleashed one of the fiercest disputes in anthropology.

The Flores Hobbit's face revealed

Dec 10, 2012

An Australian anthropologist has used forensic facial reconstruction techniques to show, for the first time, how the mysterious Flores 'hobbit' might have once looked.

Lucy and Selam's species climbed trees

Oct 25, 2012

Australopithecus afarensis (the species of the well-known "Lucy" skeleton) was an upright walking species, but the question of whether it also spent much of its time in trees has been the subject of much debate, partly becaus ...

Recommended for you

US company sells out of Ebola toys

Oct 17, 2014

They might look tasteless, but satisfied customers dub them cute and adorable. Ebola-themed toys have proved such a hit that one US-based company has sold out.

New progress of the Neogene Suidae research

Oct 17, 2014

Dr. Hou Sukuan and Prof. Deng Tao from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology(IVPP), Chinese Academy of Sciences reported a new species of Chleuastochoerus from the Linxia Basin, Gansu ...

Gypsies and travellers on the English Green Belt

Oct 17, 2014

The battle between Gypsies, Travellers and the settled community over how land can be used has moved to the Green Belt, observes Peter Kabachnik of the City University of New York.

Cadavers beat computers for learning anatomy

Oct 16, 2014

Despite the growing popularity of using computer simulation to help teach college anatomy, students learn much better through the traditional use of human cadavers, according to new research that has implications ...

User comments : 0