Return of osprey blessed event in England

Jul 04, 2006

A young osprey has returned to its birthplace in a wildlife sanctuary, raising hopes that the bird can be re-established in Britain.

The male, named R5, was born near Rutland Water, a reservoir in the English Midlands, in 2004. It migrated to Africa and is the first of 12 chicks born in the area since 2001 to return home, The Telegraph reported.

Tim Mackrill, the head of the Rutland Osprey Project, said the goal has always been to establish a natural osprey colony at Rutland Water, the country's largest manmade lake.

"It was a fantastic moment," Mackrill said of the bird's return. "He flew back to the nest where he was hatched, although I don't think his parents were as pleased to see him as they were in 2004."

Ospreys, large fish-eating birds, became extinct in most of the British Isles in the 19th century because of the Victorian passion for collections of eggs and stuffed birds. The first attempts to re-establish them were thwarted by DDT and other pesticides in the food chain, which resulted in thin egg shells.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Big data and the science of the Christmas tree

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Google Cardboard delivers fresh round of updates

10 hours ago

Remember all that loud talk back in June about the new Google Cardboard, an egalitarian virtual reality solution announced at I/O 2014? You can rest assured that Google is not about to put it on the shelf. Te ...

Recommended for you

Big data and the science of the Christmas tree

6 minutes ago

Often called the "Cadillac of Christmas trees," the Fraser Fir has everything a good Christmas tree should have: an even triangular shape, a sweet piney fragrance, and soft needles that (mostly) stay attached ...

Quest to unravel mysteries of our gene network

16 minutes ago

There are roughly 27,000 genes in the human body, all but a relative few of them connected through an intricate and complex network that plays a dominant role in shaping our physiological structure and functions.

EU court clears stem cell patenting

1 hour ago

A human egg used to produce stem cells but unable to develop into a viable embryo can be patented, the European Court of Justice ruled on Thursday.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.