Return of osprey blessed event in England

Jul 04, 2006

A young osprey has returned to its birthplace in a wildlife sanctuary, raising hopes that the bird can be re-established in Britain.

The male, named R5, was born near Rutland Water, a reservoir in the English Midlands, in 2004. It migrated to Africa and is the first of 12 chicks born in the area since 2001 to return home, The Telegraph reported.

Tim Mackrill, the head of the Rutland Osprey Project, said the goal has always been to establish a natural osprey colony at Rutland Water, the country's largest manmade lake.

"It was a fantastic moment," Mackrill said of the bird's return. "He flew back to the nest where he was hatched, although I don't think his parents were as pleased to see him as they were in 2004."

Ospreys, large fish-eating birds, became extinct in most of the British Isles in the 19th century because of the Victorian passion for collections of eggs and stuffed birds. The first attempts to re-establish them were thwarted by DDT and other pesticides in the food chain, which resulted in thin egg shells.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Obama recommends extended wilderness zone in Alaska

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Drought sees Rio's main hydro plant turned off

3 hours ago

A major Rio hydroelectric power plant was switched off after water levels slipped below an operational minimum following severe drought, Brazil's national grid told AFP on Thursday.

Recommended for you

Researchers identify new mechanism to aid cells under stress

1 hour ago

A team of biologists from NYU and Harvard has identified new details in a cellular mechanism that serves as a defense against stress. The findings potentially offer insights into tumor progression and neurodegenerative diseases, ...

Researchers image and measure tubulin transport in cilia

2 hours ago

Defective cilia can lead to a host of diseases and conditions in the human body—from rare, inherited bone malformations to blindness, male infertility, kidney disease and obesity. Scientists knew that somehow ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.