Wind farm cuts eagle population

Jun 23, 2006

Britain's Royal Society for the Protection of Birds says a wind farm off the Norwegian coast has reduced the population of Europe's largest eagle.

The society says only one white-tailed eagle is expected to fledge from the site on the bird's former stronghold of Smøla islands.

The RSPB says turbine blades have killed nine of the birds in the last 10 months including all three chicks that fledged last year. Norway is regarded as the most important place for white-tailed eagles.

In 1989, Smøla was designated as having one of the highest densities of white-tailed eagles in the world. But the society now fears the 100 or so more wind farms planned in the rest of Norway could have a similar impact.

"Smøla is demonstrating the damage that can be caused by a wind farm in the wrong location. The RSPB strongly supports renewable energies including wind, but the deaths of adult birds and the three young born last year make the prospects for white-tailed eagles on the island look bleak," said Dr. Rowan Langston, senior research biologist at the RSPB.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Rising temperatures can be hard on dogs

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

How Kindle Unlimited compares with Scribd, Oyster

12 hours ago

Amazon is the latest—and largest—company to offer unlimited e-books for a monthly fee. Here's how Kindle Unlimited, which Amazon announced Friday, compares with rivals Scribd and Oyster.

NASA sees powerful thunderstorms in Tropical Storm Matmo

12 hours ago

Strong thunderstorms reaching toward the top of the troposphere circled Tropical Storm Matmo's center and appeared in a band of thunderstorms on the storm's southwestern quadrant. Infrared imagery from NASA's ...

ISS 'space truck' launch postponed: Arianespace

14 hours ago

The July 24 launch of a robot ship to deliver provisions to the International Space Station has been postponed "for a few days", space transport firm Arianespace said Friday.

Recommended for you

Rising temperatures can be hard on dogs

6 hours ago

The "dog days of summer" are here, but don't let the phrase fool you. This hot time of year can be dangerous for your pup, says a Kansas State University veterinarian.

Monkeys fear big cats less, eat more, with humans around

9 hours ago

Some Monkeys in South Africa have been found to regard field scientists as human shields against predators and why not if the alternative is death by leopard? The researchers found the monkeys felt far safer ...

User comments : 0