NASA changes Boeing space station contract

Oct 06, 2005

Officials at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston announced a modification Wednesday to a contract with The Boeing Co.

The modification, valued at more than $94 million, consolidates work done in support of international space station payload integration activities.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration modification transfers a portion of work from one contract to another to consolidate activities. The projects include payload engineering integration; payload software integration; flight software production, and logistics support.

NASA said Boeing will continue to manage the overall space station payload integration process.

The contract covers work at NASA's Johnson Space Center, the Florida-based Kennedy Space Center, and the Marshall Space Flight Center at Huntsville, Ala.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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