Gorillas spotted using tools

Oct 01, 2005

Gorillas have been spotted using sticks as tools in the Republic of Congo, report scientists with the Wildlife Conservation Society.

While distant relatives of the gorilla, including chimpanzees, orangutans and man, have been known to use tools, this is believed to be the first sighting involving gorillas, reported Sky News Friday.

Thomas Breuer, of the Wildlife Conservation Society, filmed a gorilla using a branch as a walking stick, and another used a slender tree trunk as support while gathering food, reported the Times of London.

"Tool use in wild apes provides us with valuable insights into the evolution of our own species," said Breuer.

The findings have been published in the online journal, PLoS Biology.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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