Briefs: New invertebrate species found in Israel

May 30, 2006

Scientists at Israel's Hebrew University in Jerusalem say they have discovered a new species of invertebrate animals.

The researchers say the discovery was made in a cave that was uncovered as a result of excavations in a quarry near Ramle, Israel.

Scientists who examined the cave say they discovered "a new and unique ecosystem," including previously unknown aquatic and terrestrial species.

The scientists have scheduled a Wednesday news conference to reveal details of their find.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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