Model to better understand dune plants

Sep 24, 2005

Texas A&M University researchers have created a model to better understand the impacts of development and coastal erosion on plant communities.

Rusty Feagin, Douglas Sherman and William Grant simulated varying levels of sea-level rise to understand the effects of erosion and development on sand dune plants.

In most circumstances, as coastlines erode plant communities are displaced away from the ocean, unless blocked by a barrier, such as a cliff. In areas like Galveston Island, natural cliffs are not the issue, but development and non-native lawns block the plants' migration, according to Feagin.

Creating models to explore low, medium and high increases in sea levels for Galveston Island, Feagin and colleagues found the combination of human-created barriers and sea level rise trapped plants in a small zone -- altering the plant population as well as the dune structure.

The findings were published in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: China's reform of R&D budget management doesn't go far enough, research shows

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Australia launches 'Green Army' for environment

Aug 02, 2014

Australia on Saturday launched its 'Green Army' which plans to recruit up to 15,000 young people for projects to conserve and rehabilitate the environment—the biggest land care mobilisation in the nation's ...

Taking NASA-USGS's Landsat 8 to the beach

Jul 14, 2014

Some things go swimmingly with a summer trip to the beach – sunscreen, mystery novels, cold beverages and sandcastles. Other things – like aquatic algae – are best avoided.

Discovering the artists of the Eastern Sahara

May 20, 2014

The identification of rock art found in Farafra as Neolithic adds substance to the argument that Egypt drew on cultural influences from Africa as well as the Near East.  At a talk tonight (19 May, 2014) archaeologist ...

Recommended for you

Precarious work schedules common among younger workers

10 hours ago

One wish many workers may have this Labor Day is for more control and predictability of their work schedules. A new report finds that unpredictability is widespread in many workers' schedules—one reason ...

User comments : 0