N.J. dental students accused of cheating

May 17, 2006

New Jersey's only dental school is investigating allegations that 18 students traded or sold clinical procedure credits they need to graduate, a report said.

The New Jersey Dental School cheating scandal came to light when students who had not met their required number of clinical procedures to graduate complained about classmates' alleged wrongdoing.

"It's cheating and it's outright wrong," Dean Cecile Feldman told the Newark (N.J.) Star Ledger.

"It's not a majority of the class, but it is sizable," she said of the 18 students suspected out of 84 who are supposed to graduate Sunday.

Penalties range from repeating clinical dental work to outright dismissal, Feldman said.

The cheating scandal is the latest woe to hit the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, and could cost the dental school and the university its accreditation, the newspaper reported.

The Newark university already is under a federal monitor for alleged corruption and is the focus of an ongoing criminal investigation.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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