Creationism flap stirred in Britain

Apr 24, 2006

Australian geologist John Mackay, a well known creationist, Monday started a controversial speaking tour of British secondary schools and universities.

Mackay believes he has found fossil evidence proving it was not evolution that produced the world, but, rather, God, who created all life during six days, The Independent reported.

His eight-week visit has elicited anger from scientists, who told The Independent they are concerned about what they view as an increasing focus by evangelists on children.

The London newspaper noted Mackay's tour has also drawn criticism from teacher's unions and various secular groups, all of which condemn the exposure of a captive audience of children to his views.

The Royal Society recently issued a statement arguing creationism has no place in schools and students must understand that scientific evidence supports the theory of evolution.

Geneticist and author Steve Jones said suggesting creationism and evolution be given equal weight in education was "rather like starting genetics lectures by discussing the theory that babies are brought by storks."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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