Boston Design Center offers customers the opportunity to employ its AMD64 engineering expertise

Aug 03, 2004

At LinuxWorld today, AMD formally introduced its Professional Design Support Services program, available through the AMD Boston Design Center. Created to help speed a customer’s design and time-to-market, the Professional Design Support Services program supports development of AMD64 processor-based products, from embedded systems and client products to high-end High Performance Computing (HPC) servers.

Customers who take advantage of the subscription-based services can receive assistance from some of AMD’s top engineering talent while having access to certain reference designs, Web-based issue trackers and step-by-step support in their creative process as they develop products based on AMD64 technology with Direct Connect Architecture.

“This is a natural extension of our customer-centric philosophy,” said Marty Seyer, corporate vice president and general manager of the Microprocessor Business Unit, Computation Products Group at AMD. “Sharing what we have learned about the design of AMD64 technology-based systems and enabling any sized company, from the smallest start-up to the largest OEM, to profit from our expertise is proof of the passion we have for our customers’ success.”

"The Boston Design Center's expertise was critical to reducing our development time and speeding the CRAY XD1 system to market," said Paul Terry, Chief Technical Officer at CRAY. "HyperTransport™ technology plays a vital role in the Cray XD1 direct connected processor architecture. Having some of the original developers of HyperTransport technology involved in the design process from the beginning saved us a great deal of time."

AMD64 technology with Direct Connect Architecture is uniquely suited to enable a wide range of distinctive design points for customers. Technology companies can choose to create unique multi-processing boards based on the scalability and leading-edge performance of the AMD Opteron™ processor. Many companies are choosing to take advantage of the unique I/O and unprecedented bus speeds of HyperTransport technology, while others are focusing on eliminating bridge bottlenecks and reducing system costs. As co-developers of HyperTransport technology, the engineers at the Boston Design Center are especially qualified to help lead innovative companies to market with compelling new products.

“By leveraging AMD’s Professional Design Support Services, we were able to design and deliver a rugged, high-performance, quad-processor solution for our real-time cluster computing system in record time,” said Dr. Ralph Barrera, Distributed Computing Product Manager at Curtiss-Wright Controls Embedded Computing. “AMD went above and beyond in providing us the tools and the technical support during our product design and integration phases.”

Technology companies interested in developing hardware designs with AMD can contact the Boston Design Center directly at professional.services@amd.com.

About AMD64
AMD64 evolves the industry-standard 32-bit x86 architecture to support the demanding 64-bit environment that will enable future generations of computer functionality and productivity. AMD designed the AMD64 platform to allow end users to enjoy reliable, best-in-class performance on the 32-bit software they own today while preparing for a seamless transition to high-performance 64-bit applications. The AMD64 architecture also enables a more secure computing environment by integrating technology that can take advantage of advanced anti-virus features in upcoming software.

Since the introduction of the AMD64 architecture in 2003, the AMD Opteron processor for servers and workstations and the AMD Athlon™ 64 processors for desktop and notebook computers have earned more than 45 awards for innovation and performance and the support of more than 2,000 OEMs, hardware and software developers, system builders, and distributors.

About HyperTransport™ Technology
HyperTransport technology is a high-speed, high-performance, point-to-point link for integrated circuits and is designed to meet the bandwidth needs of tomorrow’s computing and communications platforms. HyperTransport technology helps reduce the number of buses while providing a high-performance link for PCs, workstations and servers, as well as numerous embedded applications and highly scalable multiprocessing systems. It is designed to allow chips inside of PCs, networking and communications devices to communicate with each other as much as 48 times faster than with some existing bus technologies.

The original press release is available here.

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