ICSU: Widen world's scientific capacities

Sep 14, 2005

In an unprecedented statement to the U.N. General Assembly, the International Council for Science has urged widening the planet's scientific capacities.

The scientific, engineering and medical organization said stronger capacities in science and technology are required to allow humanity to achieve the U.N. Millennium Development Goals -- including significant reduction of global poverty and elimination of illiteracy, hunger and discrimination against women.

The ICSU said in a statement, "Sustained progress in reducing poverty and related problems require strengthened institutions for science, technology and innovation throughout the world, including in each developing nation."

ICSU Executive Director Thomas Rosswall said, "Science is essential for sound decision making, as well as for technological development and national innovation systems."

ICSU represents several organizations, including the InterAcademy Council; the International Council of Academies of Engineering and Technological Sciences; the World Federation of Engineering Organizations; the Academy of Sciences for the Developing World and the U.N. Millennium Project.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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