Mouse to man: The story of chromosomes

Apr 19, 2006

U.S. scientists say sequencing human chromosome 17 and mouse chromosome 11 has offered unique insights into the evolution of the genome of higher mammals.

A Baylor College of Medicine researcher who participated in the effort says the work represents the first time a mouse chromosome has been completely sequenced and annotated.

That feat, says Professor James Lupski, presents scientists with the opportunity to intensively examine the similarities and differences in the DNA sequence of human and mouse.

Lupski was brought into the work while on sabbatical at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in Cambridge, England. The Sanger Institute, the Broad Institute of MIT, and Harvard University were the primary institutions involved in the sequencing effort.

Lupski says the study presents a clearer picture of how genome changes through evolution.

"As we go up the mammalian line, and particularly in primate, it is obvious that rearrangement in the genome is the predominant force in the evolution of genomes," said Lupski. "Perhaps one way to evolve faster is not by making changes (the chemicals that make up DNA), but by changing chunks of genome."

The study appears in the journal Nature.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Public boarding school—the way to solve educational ills?

Related Stories

Why Jurassic World could never work

Apr 14, 2015

When the first Jurassic Park movie hit the silver screens in 1993, I cried. Never before had dinosaurs, those magnificent creatures of bygone days, been brought to life so realistically. It was a palaeon ...

Evolution: The genetic connivances of digits and genitals

Nov 20, 2014

During the development of mammals, the growth and organization of digits are orchestrated by Hox genes, which are activated very early in precise regions of the embryo. These "architect genes" are themselves regulated by ...

Special chromosomal structures control key genes

Oct 09, 2014

Within almost every human cell is a nucleus six microns in diameter—about one 300th of a human hair's width—that is filled with roughly three meters of DNA. As the instructions for all cell processes, the DNA must be ...

Recommended for you

Public boarding school—the way to solve educational ills?

Apr 25, 2015

Buffalo's chronically struggling school system is considering an idea gaining momentum in other cities: public boarding schools that put round-the-clock attention on students and away from such daunting problems as poverty, ...

Study finds we think better on our feet, literally

Apr 24, 2015

A study from the Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Public Health finds students with standing desks are more attentive than their seated counterparts. In fact, preliminary results show 12 percent ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.