Study: Color plays role in perception

Apr 19, 2006

U.S. scientists have discovered a neural circuit they say is likely to play an important role in the visual perception of moving objects.

The finding, say researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, Calif., forces neurobiologists to rethink the neural pathways our brain relies on to detect motion.

It has long been assumed sensory information about color and fine detail is relatively unimportant for perceiving moving objects -- mainly because the neural pathways in the brain carrying color and fine detail information seemed to be completely separate from areas of the brain previously associated with motion processing.

But now, Salk researchers show a neural pathway carrying color and fine detail most likely helps the brain detect moving objects.

"There are many different kinds of cues in the visual environment that can be used to detect motion -- basically anything that is moving," says Neurobiology Professor Edward Callaway, senior author of the study. "We asked the question, 'Is motion processing taking advantage of the full range of possible cues?'"

He said the study demonstrates for the first time that it is.

The research appears in the journal Nature.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Wyoming cave with fossil secrets to be excavated

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

The promise and peril of nanotechnology

Mar 26, 2014

Scientists at Northwestern University have found a way to detect metastatic breast cancer by arranging strands of DNA into spherical shapes and using them to cover a tiny particle of gold, creating a "nano-flare" ...

Recommended for you

Narcissistic CEOs and financial performance

8 hours ago

Narcissism, considered by some as the "dark side of the executive personality," may actually be a good thing when it comes to certain financial measures, with companies led by narcissistic CEOs outperforming those helmed ...

Election surprises tend to erode trust in government

8 hours ago

When asked who is going to win an election, people tend to predict their own candidate will come out on top. When that doesn't happen, according to a new study from the University of Georgia, these "surprised losers" often ...

User comments : 0