Study: Color plays role in perception

Apr 19, 2006

U.S. scientists have discovered a neural circuit they say is likely to play an important role in the visual perception of moving objects.

The finding, say researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, Calif., forces neurobiologists to rethink the neural pathways our brain relies on to detect motion.

It has long been assumed sensory information about color and fine detail is relatively unimportant for perceiving moving objects -- mainly because the neural pathways in the brain carrying color and fine detail information seemed to be completely separate from areas of the brain previously associated with motion processing.

But now, Salk researchers show a neural pathway carrying color and fine detail most likely helps the brain detect moving objects.

"There are many different kinds of cues in the visual environment that can be used to detect motion -- basically anything that is moving," says Neurobiology Professor Edward Callaway, senior author of the study. "We asked the question, 'Is motion processing taking advantage of the full range of possible cues?'"

He said the study demonstrates for the first time that it is.

The research appears in the journal Nature.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Woolly mammoth skeleton sold at UK auction

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Learning from robots

Oct 29, 2014

In a Bavarian village, Mathias Hubrich is building remotely controlled robots designed to perform tasks too dangerous for human beings. Robots are now also being used as teaching aids because their Siemens ...

The promise and peril of nanotechnology

Mar 26, 2014

Scientists at Northwestern University have found a way to detect metastatic breast cancer by arranging strands of DNA into spherical shapes and using them to cover a tiny particle of gold, creating a "nano-flare" ...

Recommended for you

Golden Ratio offers unity of science

2 minutes ago

Researchers from the Universities of the Witwatersrand and Pretoria are also suggesting that the "Golden Ratio" – designated by the Greek symbol ∅ (letter Phi) with a mathematical value of about 1.618 – also relates ...

Consumer sentiment brightens holiday spending

2 hours ago

Consumer confidence posted its fourth consecutive monthly gain in November, rising to its highest level since July 2007, according to the Thomson Reuters/University of Michigan Surveys of Consumers.

Woolly mammoth skeleton sold at UK auction

17 hours ago

The skeleton of an Ice Age woolly mammoth fetched £189,000 ($300,000, 239.000 euros) at auction Wednesday as it went under the hammer in Britain with a host of other rare or extinct species.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.