Michigan plans to cut mercury emissions

Apr 19, 2006

Michigan Gov. Jennifer Granholm has announced plans to reduce mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants by 90 percent in the next decade.

Granholm ordered state regulators to write and adopt new rules for the plants, the Detroit Free Press reported.

Michigan has 21 plants that use coal. In 1999, the coal-fired plants released 3,000 tons of mercury.

Mercury is believed to be harmful to human health with its effects most severe for children and pregnant women.

"Mercury poses a real and serious health concern for the people of Michigan," Granholm said. "We are ensuring that future generations can enjoy clean air and safe water."

Power companies were not enthusiastic about Granholm's proposal. Dan Bishop, a spokesman for Consumers Energy, said that no proven technology available now can deliver what Granholm wants.

"People are in agreement that there should be reductions," Bishop said. "But when we invest our customers' money we need proven technology."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: SDO captures images of two mid-level flares

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

SDO captures images of two mid-level flares

Dec 19, 2014

The sun emitted a mid-level flare on Dec. 18, 2014, at 4:58 p.m. EST. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the sun constantly, captured an image of the event. Solar flares are powerful bursts ...

Why is Venus so horrible?

Dec 19, 2014

Venus sucks. Seriously, it's the worst. The global temperature is as hot as an oven, the atmospheric pressure is 90 times Earth, and it rains sulfuric acid. Every part of the surface of Venus would kill you ...

Image: Christmas wrapping the Sentinel-3A antenna

Dec 19, 2014

The moment a team of technicians, gowned like hospital surgeons, wraps the Sentinel-3A radar altimeter in multilayer insulation to protect it from the temperature extremes found in Earth orbit.

Video: Flying over Becquerel

Dec 19, 2014

This latest release from the camera on ESA's Mars Express is a simulated flight over the Becquerel crater, showing large-scale deposits of sedimentary material.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.