Wireless cancer treatment device developed

Apr 18, 2006

Purdue University scientists are building a tiny wireless device that could be implanted in tumors to register the precise dose of radiation received.

The units -- the size of a grain of rice -- will also enable physicians to determine the exact position of tumors during treatment, Purdue engineers said.

Researchers have tested a dime-size prototype and expect to have the miniature version completed by the end of summer, said Babak Ziaie, an associate professor in the Purdue School of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

"Currently, there is no way of knowing the exact dose of radiation received by a tumor," Ziaie said. "And, because most organs shift inside the body depending on whether a patient is sitting or lying down, for example, the tumor also shifts," said Ziaie. "This technology will allow doctors to pinpoint the exact position of the tumor to more effectively administer radiation treatments."

The device, a "passive wireless transponder," has no batteries and will be activated with electrical coils placed next to the body.

The research was detailed in a paper presented earlier this year during the 19th IEEE International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: King Richard III died painfully on battlefield

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Cincinnati professor nominated for Nobel dies (Update)

Dec 21, 2012

(AP)—Elwood Jensen, an award-winning University of Cincinnati professor nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize for work that opened the door to advances in fighting cancer, has died of pneumonia. He was 92.

Recommended for you

King Richard III died painfully on battlefield

7 hours ago

England's King Richard III might well have lost his kingdom for a horse. The reviled king suffered nearly a dozen injuries on the battlefield, but the fatal blows were probably only sustained after he had to abandon his horse, ...

History books spark latest Texas classroom battle

10 hours ago

As Texas mulls new history textbooks for its 5-plus million public school students, some academics are decrying lessons they say exaggerate the influence of Christian values on America's Founding Fathers.

Flatow, 'Science Friday' settle claims over grant

10 hours ago

Federal prosecutors say radio host Ira Flatow and his "Science Friday" show that airs on many National Public Radio stations have settled civil claims that they misused money from a nearly $1 million federal ...

'Hidden Treasure of Rome' project unveiled

11 hours ago

For more than a century, hundreds of thousands of historical artifacts dating back to before the founding of Rome have been stored in crates in the Capitoline Museums of Rome, where they have remained mostly untouched. Now, ...

Poverty rate drops for the first time since 2006

12 hours ago

The poverty rate in the United States has dropped for the first time since 2006, bringing a bit of encouraging news about the nation's economy as President Barack Obama and Congress gear up for the November elections.

User comments : 0